Archives for posts with tag: young women
Image courtesy of the Old Design Sop, a vintage image treasury.

Image courtesy of the Old Design Shop, a vintage image treasury.

In preparation
          for life’s many little pageants

We brush out our hair,
cut the dry, split ends,
straighten out the frizz.
We lather up our legs
and smooth out the bristle.
We take concealer to those rings beneath our tired eyes
and layer over the unhappy spots.
We tint tiny rainbows on our eyelids
and add a flick of Cleopatra’s kohl.
Heeled, contoured, groomed, composed,
we stage a tincture of our most come-hither selves.

Emily, sister and sweetheart of the modern boy, returns. Here she offers some observations about her sisters at their pre-seduction toilette.

This time last year, I gathered together twenty-five poems inspired by Emily, an ego de plume who communicates with the Modern Boy. Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys covers the broad topics of life, work and love. Preview it here.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books:
In the Ocean: a year of poetry
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012

Sunflower courtesy of the Old Design Shop. Illustration by Kate Greenaway on sheet music from c. 1881.

An old favourite revisited, because artists are allowed to have their obsessions. “Exalted thus, we left” is a reworking of a poem from 2011:

I love the Dorothea Tanning painting that spurred the original “Jacob’s Dream for crinolined girls”. When I’m in Tate Modern, I’ll usually try to pop into the Surrealism gallery to gaze at the image, my crinolined protagonists and the yellow angel wrestled down.

The first version of this verse is one of twenty selected poems in Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012.
My other books include In the Ocean: a year of poetry, which came out in last month, and Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys.

Find me on Twitter as @BeadedQuill and on Facebook.

256px-Jack_and_Jill

Image attribution: Sue Clark (Flickr: Jack and Jill) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This time last year I revisited a poem based on the Jack and Jill nursery rhyme. This version was a shortened version of the ‘Tumbling After‘ I had written the previous December.

Both versions veer towards the same scene: Jill watching Jack from afar and awaiting his delivery. Although not true to the nursery rhyme’s narrative, I fabricated my own thematic direction. I wanted to evoke a pastoral world in which young people worked in particular gendered realms and were awakening to an adolescent sexuality. So I placed Jill in the kitchen baking bread and Jack outside in the field hoeing and on the hill collecting water.

If you’re curious about the original nursery rhyme you might find the Wikipedia write up interesting. I stumbled across it while preparing this post. A further link was this handy visualization of the rhyme. Perhaps you’ll have as much fun as I did playing with the graphic display options.

Both versions of ‘Tumbling After’ are included in my book, Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys.

You’re all my favourite readers, but… I have a particularly ideal reader. She is well read and articulate and to her wise critique I have entrusted a few unpolished drafts. Her first response to this poem was a giggling, “Hehehe, you put ‘cock’ in the title.”

Well, dear other favourite readers, the two of us had watched a great many seasons of Sex in the City together. Although the original poem was not written in Carrie Bradshaw’s pun-ladled tone, for fun you may read it so. Kindly then imagine further, this poet musing at her laptop on manboys, love and life. Throw in a stylish and quirky wardrobe and fabulous shoes. These props definitely help the writing.

“The Old Cock and the Younger Hens” found its way into my book published in November last year. Please preview Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys here.