Archives for posts with tag: performance
Opera House Haymarket edited

By Thomas Rowlandson (1756–1827) and Augustus Charles Pugin (1762–1832) (after) John Bluck (fl. 1791–1819), Joseph Constantine Stadler (fl. 1780–1812), Thomas Sutherland (1785–1838), J. Hill, and Harraden (aquatint engravers) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

And music

again. A new tip for setting limits
plenty, more besides. It’s all
there you hear the benefit
after a couple the other
way would be to try
put it back. Cue
the lights


I hope you enjoy today’s verse distilled from sentences off the interweb. No, I’m not quite sure what it is all about.

Cue the lights and the music, for sure.

BeadedQuill
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256px-Piano_Keys

Piano Keys‘ by Truls (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

One two three four
One two three. And a 
oneity two three four
one two three _ [fine]

Oneity oneity oneity oneity
oneity two three four-a
yeah ah peep for
Parp twoity three _

Oneity two me four
this song’s three four-a
want to join me? 
Catch twoity three _ [Da capo]


The beginning/end-of-the month weekend when people move from their rented accommodation proves a fruitful time for random pavement bounty. Yesterday’s gift was a plastic bag of abandoned CDs. It was Monteverdi’s Vespers of the Blessed Virgin that first caught my eye, but home with me also came Jagged Little Pill, Alanis Morrisette’s soundtrack to my mid-adolescence, and the wild card, twenty tracks of The Best of Boogie Woogie.

This afternoon I’ve been listening to the Boogie Woogie CD.

In today’s Guardian, television presenter and Forward prize for poetry judge Jeremy Paxman writes that contemporary poets write for each other, rendering poetry irrelevant to ordinary readers. This may indeed be true. I write most often for myself and an imagined ideal reader, rather than The Public at Large.

Together with the Boogie Woogie his comments inspired some self-indulgent pseudo-improv.

So here-above, and a-oneity two three _, is a song just for me. Readers, join in if you wish. Performance directions are included. (Da capo means ‘return to the beginning (lit. head)’ and fine indicates the end of the piece. I.e. to perform you must follow verses one to three, then repeat verse one.)

If this arrangement doesn’t please you, take some wisdom from ‘Pine Top’ Smith. In Pine Top’s Boogie Woogie he calls the crowd to,

“Mess around!”

And a
oneity twoity three four. Forget those poets.
Make your own poetry! Mess around.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill 
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All BeadedQuill’s books are available for preview and purchase. Click on the links below:
In the Ocean: a year of poetry
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012

John William Waterhouse, "A Mermaid," 1900 Oil on canvas, 96.5 x 66.6 cm. Image courtesy of WikiCommons (http://bit.ly/162XAUQ)

John William Waterhouse, “A Mermaid,” 1900 Oil on canvas, 96.5 x 66.6 cm. Image courtesy of WikiCommons (http://bit.ly/162XAUQ)

as the Gothic Mermaid

in Act II

I siren from a fathomless sea

The kelp forest undulates to pulse.

 

in Act II

I am a Gothic Mermaid

my sequined scales swish side-to-side

I am suspended by a cable.

J. W. Waterhouse (1849 – 1917) submitted “A Mermaid” to the Royal Academy as his diploma work. Read more about Waterhouse and this painting on the RA website.

Follow me, @BeadedQuill, on Twitter where I tweet about art and performances I’ve attended.

I invite you to preview my first published volume of poetry here.