Archives for posts with tag: love
OldDesignShop_YoungLove

Image from Two Children by F. E. Weatherly, illustrated by M. Ellen Edwards, circa 1884, and via the Old Design Shop.

It’s complicated” posted this time last year proposed a point-blank assessment of The Relationship Drama, especially as recounted by heterosexual women (as this encompasses most of my experience). It’s the “He loves me, he loves me not, why doesn’t he love me?” tune. The poet/narrator declares, none of this is complicated. Either it moves forward, or it doesn’t.

I noted in the accompanying write-up to the post:

“My younger sister prophesied that one day I – à la Carrie Bradshaw – would be sitting at my laptop in my apartment typing up many a misadventure. This evening almost fulfills her premonition, bar the fact that I type this in my little rented room.”

The likeness to Carrie Bradshaw has veered even further towards uncanny fulfillment. Over the last couple of months I have once again dabbled with dating, partially because I thought it would be interesting to meet a potential partner and partially because I sought new writing material. Previously, I had written about love, attraction, dating and relationships through Emily, the sister and sweetheart of the modern boy.

Not this time ’round. My current note-taker in the field is crazier, quirkier, more abrasive. She is yet to be named and she is yet to make her observations public, but watch this space.

Keep up-to-date with BQ’s news on Twitter (@BeadedQuill) or Facebook
Read all twenty-five poems gathered by Emily “for edification and amusement” in Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys

A year’s worth of poetry, 104 offerings in total, make up In the Ocean: a year of poetry.
Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012, BQ’s first title, charts her youthful travels and life observations.

Achilles departure Eretria Painter CdM Paris 851

© Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons, via Wikimedia Commons

Worn on the sleeve
or exposed at the heel,
	once the organ has surfaced
it is ready to bleed. Transfusion
will occur.


Following on from my experiment earlier this week with clichés, today’s verse explores idioms. It is also influenced by my current read – an engrossing book about ancient Rome and Jerusalem, in which the author mentions the influence of Ancient Greece a great deal. (For those who are interested the book is Martin Goodman’s “Rome & Jerusalem: The Clash of Ancient Civilizations.”)

In popular discourse Achilles’ heel features as metaphor for vulnerability. Similarly, to wear one’s heart on one’s sleeve is to divulge emotional weakness, usually in the form of love. The poem started with an exploration of physical and emotional defencelessness. However, in researching for this post I was reminded that Achilles was a warrior. He was prone to anger and acted to avenge. He lived by the sword and died in combat. (In another version he is shot by the brother of a Trojan princess with whom he is in love, rather than perishing in battle.)

The heart is the seat of courage. Courage derives comes from the Middle English for the seat of feelings. We often think of the heart in connection with love and romance. We seldom think of the heart in connection with rage and the transfer of aggression or avenging slights. That belongs to idioms and clichés about blood (consider “his blood was boiling,” “there was bad blood between them” and “he was spitting blood”). In its quiet way, this poem explores the transfusion of both rage and of love; both of which reflect our lifeblood of passion and our vulnerability.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books:
In the Ocean: a year of poetry
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012

512px-Bicycle_two_1886

See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons. c. 1886

While it’s going for a song,
let’s play this dalliance.

It’ll knock wind from our sails.

That’s the hazard of entanglements.

Over the weekend I watched a movie about a song-writer. Many of the songs featured dreadful clichés. This prompted some fiddling of my own with clichés.

The poem’s title is thanks to an associative trigger courtesy of the illustrative photo. “Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do…” was a song from my childhood.

Interestingly, one of the few words of dating advice that came from my father was, “One does not have to be the village bicycle.”

Associative triggers. They’re a funny, possibly Freudian, business.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books:
In the Ocean: a year of poetry
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012

Another beauty courtesy of the Old Design Shop, a vintage image treasury.

Another beauty courtesy of the Old Design Shop, a vintage image treasury.

My use of maritime imagery predates the well received poem of August, “Tall Ship“. For example, there is also this poem posted last year, “Preceding seafaring that was not to transpire“.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books

To kiss a little human huckleberry

My poem ‘Huckleberry Thing‘ is such a crowd favourite that it gives me great pleasure to have an excuse to share it yet again with you, my readers.

It is one of the twenty poems in my first book, Shining in Brightness: Selected Poems, 1999 – 2012.


The illustration image was donated by Pearson Scott Foresman, an educational publisher, to Wikimedia Commons, and is thereby in the Public Domain.

It’s a bright day,
just the right day
to expect you to fly home.
When you land, hey –
give me a call –
and we can let our banter roam.

A short and simple request on behalf of all who have ever endured the irritation of long-distance romance. This is also the final offering from my set of six love-themed poems posted across this Valentine’s week.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books:
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness 

Younger is a funny, joy-filled beast
whose appetite seeks charms 
and luscious treats,
yet he knows there is wide, wide world.
So, off he bleets 
once supped and full.

The older – add scores two, a half, minus ten –
knows this landscape of plenty
shifts by hurt and over time 
lithe limb and limber they pass, too.
So, his grasp, though no less fleeting,
strikes quick and fast, then dulled.
He’s done the nest 
and picket fence, or not. Older he
knows best how to feather his bed.

Younger and older have a brother
close to “just right”. He is 
the most wary and sniffs out 
the approach. He weighs options, 
juggles plates, sows oats 
and waits while life does
some marinating of wings, legs, 
thighs and breasts. Just right
can measure and asses. Take his pick
and then exit the marketplace.


There are the younger lads, the older men and the ones within a single woman’s own age-bracket. In the wake of Valentine’s Day, I present these brothers three who were, no doubt, out on the prowl last night.

I tweet as @BeadedQuill about my writing life, my interest in soft martial arts, dancing and the pleasures of arts and culture. Sometimes I share about my dating life on Twitter, but more often the experiences inspire poetry.

If you’re not on Twitter, perhaps you’d like to find BeadedQuill on Facebook instead.

In 2013 I brought out two books of collected poems. They are available through the print-on-demand site blurb.co.uk. Click on the titles below to preview each:

Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys – Twenty-five poems offering insights on life, love and work for the Modern Boy.
Shining in Brightness – Twenty poems and two essays on creative process charting a ‘mystical decade’ of writing. The author documents her experiences in four continents and across three life phases – as student, traveller and young adult.

Ten days ago
I didn’t know you.
Didn’t know you 
walked the streets 
of anywhere
walked the streets
of London
Didn’t know
you 
Didn’t know you 
had walked 
the dusty sights of that anywhere 
near where I had
breathed the streets of 
there 
and then in London.
I didn’t know the sight of 
each “1 new message” 
could stop my lungs 
for 58 hours
stop those bellows in my chest 
which

for fifty-

eight 

hours 

half-inflate.

If I text,
will I have blown it?


Said plainly in acknowledgement of Valentine’s Day.

Both of my recently published books include poems on love and relationships. Preview by clicking on the titles below:

Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys

Shining in Brightness

Follow me on Twitter as @BeadedQuill or pop over to the BeadedQuill Facebook page.

 

The radio station holds
a ‘phone-in about How to
Seduce Every Sign of the Zodiac.
Every star-sign, says the guest expert,
has a romance silhouette.
Taurus to Scorpio sound good.
Pass on the Virgos
and Cancerians.

22/12/13

Anything to do with signs and symbolism pulls at my imagination. Just today I was thinking about the symbolic resonances of my first, middle and sur- names.  The fascination is with how humans try to make sense of the world through words, images and parallel realms of meaning.

I seldom read astrological predictions, but identify in myself qualities that could be listed as quintessentially Cancerian: homemaker, moon-ruled, tidal (i.e. excusably moody), quite happy to hide away in my shell or under a metaphorical rock, a little sensitive and, as required, more than ready to whip my crabby pincers into action. Zodiac signs, especially in romantic pairings, may be hooey. Yet, it might be worth knowing that in love Virgos are regarded as pernickety, over analytical with a leaning towards rescuing, while Cancerians are supposedly sensitive, moody and armoured by their shells. Taureans and Scorpios must also have their faults, but for the sake of a poem, we shall let them pass.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books:
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness

Actually it’s very simple.
Either it’s in motion
or it is not.
This bears the signs
of not.
That bears the signs
of motion.
Words to-ing and fro-ing
And actions
Everything bears
the mask of nonsense.

13/1/14

A liberating revelation in my younger youth was the concept of He’s Just Not That Into You (HJNTIY). The rule-of-thumb is if someone in whom you are interested is not pursuing you, they’re really not that interested in return. In the  book  (and movie) and common understanding, the pursuit is framed as man pursues woman. I have found it a useful concept for relationships of all sorts, including job offers and even dealing with estate or travel agents. Brutal, un-nuanced and woefully marginalising of women’s agency, HJNTIY is however a great counter approach for those with too much headspace for pining, mooning and generally idealised, but unrequited, romanticism. This imaginative energy can then be better applied to creativity – playing halting Romantic Lieder on the piano, dancing Argentine tango and writing bad poetry.

It has been ten years since the book proposing HJNTIY (and its Sex in the City dialogue cameo) entered popular discourse. This probably dates me. I still consider myself more a younger sister who looked up to the SITC quartet than a peer of the Girls generation. (In fact, my younger sister prophesied that one day I – à la Carrie Bradshaw – would be sitting at my laptop in my apartment typing up many a misadventure. This evening almost fulfills her premonition, bar the fact that I type this in my little rented room.)

Many of my lovely, often truly heartbroken friends as well as my aforementioned sister have been subjected to my less than sympathetic dismissals. It’s not complicated. Either it’s happening or it’s not. Next topic. On the other hand, I have had many a patient friend listen to my timed and dated litanies – there was this, then that, then this other thing. And, he left his cigarettes behind!

“As a smoker, I can say that truly means nothing. I’m always forgetting my cigarettes and lighters in places.”

Ah yes, that was a good misadventure from eight years ago that I’d almost forgotten. Nope, never did hear from that one again. Nor from the friend who offered the advice. But this much I know and it isn’t complicated – HJNTIY.

Twitter: @BeadedQuill
Facebook: BeadedQuill
Books:
Emily’s Poems for Modern Boys
Shining in Brightness