Stuck

Lento con agitato, for 10 minutes

to to to

tomorrow

tomorrow

tomorrow

too morrow

to

to morrow

tomorrow

row tomorrow

morrow

tomorrow tomorrow tomorrow

After the stroke

Aunt Edie struggled with tomorrow

and words. We performed patience

with wrapped chrysanthemums

for twenty minutes

each week.

She lay tied up in tubes.

In much printed Western music, there are performance instructions in the top left-hand corner. These instructions guide character and tempo. The poem above adopts this idea.

If you enjoyed “Stuck,” have a glance at my first published volume – SHINING IN BRIGHTNESS.

I tweet about my observations on life, my current practise and this abiding interest in writing. Please follow me. I’m @BeadedQuill

From a Stone

I have small veins
that have been drawn
in sinks of scalding water
and vigorous smacking.
Stopped at the upper arm
and with a pumping fist,
the supply is best tapped by the finest needle.

It is sometimes easier
to siphon off blood on Tuesdays
for doctors’ records
than write poems twice a week.

For over three decades I have had my blood taken for medical records, which have been used as teaching material by the hospitals in which I have been treated. Results tallied from my blood, a product of my body, have made a contribution to the world. It is my hope that my writing may do so, too.

My body produces and pumps blood. Surely this same physical entity should be able to produce words? One of my current projects is to write two poems a week. Over a year, this should total 104 new pieces. I sit down daily and write many lines. Sometimes the ideas and deft formations flow with ease. On other occasions, it takes some needling.

Preview my first volume of published poems, SHINING IN BRIGHTNESS.

Follow my tweets about the creative life and my running commentary on the audio-book of ‘Anna Karenina.’ I’m @BeadedQuill